7 Things I Will Not Miss About Vietnam

Before continuing to read this, I actually liked Vietnam, so don’t take this the wrong way.

Vietnam has developed a bad rap amongst travelers, with many leaving Vietnam saying they will never be back. I think that is a bit on the extreme side, or maybe we just didn’t get the worst of it,  either way, there are some things that got under my skin in Vietnam that I most certainly won’t miss (but at the same time won’t hold me back from returning).

Related Article: Best Vietnam Destinations

*When looking for the best price and biggest selection of hotels in Vietnam check prices on Booking.com, we’ve found they are the best option and have a great cancelation policy.*


#1) Not being able to walk on the sidewalk7 things I won't miss about Vietnam-6

In Vietnam the sidewalk is for motorbike parking, it’s a place to eat, a place to do business, but most certainly it is not a place to walk! And if you happen to find an inch of sidewalk it’s only a matter of seconds before someone pulls onto the sidewalk, directly in front of you, so close it makes you stop.

I found myself saying ‘Really’ a lot while walking in Vietnam; people pulling up on the sidewalk so close it makes you say ‘REALLY, you had to be right there’, ‘REALLY ,you couldn’t wait until I was passed’…

7 things I won't miss about Vietnam

#2) The scams

Everything seems to have a variable price in Vietnam. My favorite scam was on a bus ride from Da Nang to Hue, where I paid 60,000 dong to ride the bus, but when I went to go put my bag under the bus the driver claimed I owed him 100,000 dong for my bag to ride the bus. I laughed at him and put my bag under, there was no charge he just thought I was stupid.

#3) The constant line cutting7 things I won't miss about Vietnam-5

It’s like nails against a chalkboard to me when people can’t follow simple human order. Lines and order don’t matter in Vietnam, it’s whoever pushes harder or is more bold gets ahead. Surprisingly, it’s the littlest ladies that push forward and generally just don’t care. The common trick is to look confused and wander through the line until they are at the front, just staring at their ticket, or receipt, or whatever, with a stupid look on their face (but really knowing exactly what they are doing).

I still get mad thinking about one incident in an overcrowded Vietnamese grocery store, think Walmart on black Friday… A whole family of grown up sisters must have been shopping together and one family member got into the checkout line while the rest shopped.

Each come back with a cart full, and try to butt in line with their carts. Hannah points to the back of the line, we had already been in the line 20+ mins. Guess what they do…  they then proceed to throw all items into the 1 sisters cart (directly in front of us)and do 5 transactions.

Related Article: Hanoi So Much More To See Than Halong Bay

#4) Everything being Vietnamese size7 things I won't miss about Vietnam-2

We are too big for most things in most countries, but Vietnam takes the cake in small seats, bathrooms, and pretty much everything.

#5) Motorbikes

You just won’t understand the scope of this complaint until you visit Vietnam. No Vietnam travel guide can explain this chaos. I can tell you there are millions of motorbikes, but this is something you need to see to understand.

#6) Flagrant public nose picking7 things I won't miss about Vietnam-3

From the best I can determine it is perfectly acceptable to dig in right out in the open. It seems some people even manicure their nails in a nice long and pointed fashion to assist the pick. I guess there are worse things, but then you think of the nice little lady making your sandwich…

#7) Haggling on food pricesStreet Food Tour Hanoi Vietnam-8

I am used to fighting for a deal on souvenirs and things like that while traveling, but I hate fighting and feeling like I got screwed over food. Haggling in general from absurd starting prices, our general rule of thumb in Vietnam you should pay more than 1/4 of their first asking price.

#8) Not being able to get a coffee without sugar7 things I won't miss about Vietnam-4

I know I said seven, but this is a petty one, but probably made the rest worse. After a crazy look from the waitress, I would inevitably end up with an overly sweet cup of bad coffee. I just wanted black coffee, no sugar… please.

Other than that Vietnam was great! We just wanted to share with you a few things to know before traveling to Vietnam. 

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72 thoughts on “7 Things I Will Not Miss About Vietnam”

  1. Found this conversation whilst trying to find the actual reason for the lighting of the lanterns that float into the sky.
    Been twice and thinking of retiring in Vietnam. Never a problem with the people, food or any of the different experiences.
    It,s what travelling is all about.
    We asked about the local coffee at our hotel and if they could get some for us to take home.
    They got a kilo in a paper bag when we arrived back that night. $7 Thahks very much. Try and get it for tha t price back home (Australia)
    We said we couldn’t take it through customs. The next morning it was in a sealed bag.
    We found the same brand in the markets on our second trip and bought another supply.
    We loved sitting on the short stools on the sidewalk having tea (served by the old ladies ) Boiled and served in front of you so you know it’s ok.
    They do the same with coffee so you are able to say no or shake your hands to say no to sugar, milk, mint or anything extra that they want to add to your drink. No language necessary.
    Enjoyed every minute and miss it all including the traffic, smells and most of all the food.

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  2. Too true!! The noise and motorbikes drives me mental! We lived in Saigon for over a month and finally realized we had to move on. Although we also had a love hate relationship! I hear ya on the coffee. Ill go to a restaurant and ask for vegetarian food, a coffee with no sugar and fresh milk, oh and no straw. You can imagine how messed up my order turns out! 😛 But I dont blame them. Thankfully i didn’t witness the nose.pickers!!

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  3. Hey Hannah,

    I agree with most everything, except #8. You can always order black coffee at cafes in VN. It’s called “cafe den” on the menu, or if they don’t have a menu, just ask for “cafe den”; if you want it cold, then ask for “cafe den da”. I go to Vietnam almost every year since my family lives there; I’m a heavy coffee drinker so I go out for coffee every morning, but I have not been to a place (either fancy cafe or sidewalk cafe) that doesn’t offer black coffee. In fact, I usually have coffee with my aunt and/or cousin when I’m home; I like mine sweeter with condensed milk, but they always drink theirs black. So, I think you are mistaken if you say that you can’t order coffee without sugar.

    Anh

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  4. I loved Vietnam but can definitely relate to this! The sidewalk and CONSTANT beeping nearly drove me crazy!
    I would also add constantly being harassed to buy crap! We were INSIDE our hotel restaurant having dinner and they were knocking on the window trying to sell stuff to us! Just wanted to eat in peace!

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  5. I love no. 8. I always drink my coffee black without sugar, but some places in Vietnam I just couldn’t drink it. Why do they insist on putting sugar in even when you say you don’t want it?

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  6. We are into our first week in Vietnam and so far it has been a good experience. My wife and I are both over 6ft in height, so we can relate to everything being in the Vietnamese size. Food is great. People are lovely, but there are dodgy ones too. Fingers crossed that the positive vibes continue.

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  7. Oh, man. I hated crossing the street in Vietnam. It was absolutely terrifying. But as someone who likes sugar in my coffee, I sure loved Vietnamese coffee!

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  8. Haha! I can relate to so many of these! Though I have a sweet tooth so the coffee was no problem and I’m quite small so the Vietnamese sizes were no problem but I definitely don’t miss feeling like my life was at risk every time I crossed the road!

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  9. I’ve learned that honesty and integrity of service is of utmost importance since being in Vietnam and wider Asia. I’ve been on the wrong side of it soooo many times its untrue, and it feels horrible when people openly rip you off with bare faced lies. Alternately I’ve experienced some really great people, value and service, I know which one I’d prefer to be associated with by my associates and will strive to deliver it. The former is one thing I won’t miss about Vietnam… However, the positives outweigh the negatives and I’ve been privalaged to have been here 🙂

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  10. Oh Wow! After I read your post I was going to write a comment about how I also don’t like sugar in my coffee and Vietnam was one of the first places where I always got just straight, black (delicious!) coffee when I ordered “coffee, black, no sugar.” But then I started scrolling through your comments. Dang! It looks like people got really up in arms about a coffee preference! As a fellow “no sugar in my coffee” kind of a girl, I empathize that you didn’t have the same experience, and that people apparently think it’s rude to have a preference about something you consume DAILY while long-term traveling. We are leaving Vietnam tomorrow after a month to go back to Thailand and I must say I am pretty sad to leave. We loved it here and it sounds like you guys enjoyed it too 🙂

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  11. Hi Hannah,

    Just a little culture history. Drinking coffee in vietnam is a big thing, as big as baseball in america. You never criticize vietnam for not serving coffee to your liking. Same thing if you go to France, if you don’t like their coffee, it’s your problem, not theirs.

    I know you’ve already been to most asian and southern american countries, but vietnam is the only country where they are most proud of their coffee and they take drinking coffee seriously.

    If you ask any vietnamse which country serves the best coffee, all vietnamese would say, “vietnam.”

    Next time you drink coffee in vietnam, remember this, “A foreigner should never criticizes how baseball should be played in america. A foreigner should never criticizes how coffee in vietnam should be made to your liking.”

    I hope you don’t take what I wrote lightly the next time you order coffee in vietnam.

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  12. Wow, nice to see that a tongue in cheek humorous post can be taken the way it’s intended… not! Wherever you go there will be things that irritate you and it’s funny to share those with other travellers, I found myself nodding along and giggling through the whole post. It doesn’t mean you like somewhere any less, get a grip people!

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  13. Why do you come to Vietnam and expect the coffee to be catered to YOUR tastes? go to Starbucks if you want American coffee.

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    • When at a cafe that has listed an Americano hot black coffee, and I then request it as hot (no ice) and ask for no sugar/no cream I guess it’s not asking to much for that. Now if I were to go to a small coffee stand/street stall I wouldn’t expect that at all.

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  14. When I went to Saigon people tried to scam me three times in one day. I thought there was a hidden camera somewhere, because I couldn’t believe it. The first was a moto driver claiming we agreed 50000 DOngs instead of 15,000. The next said it was 20,000 per person on his moto, not for us both. And the last one was a taxi driver who at first didn’t stop where we wanted to go even though we told him we just drove past the café where we wanted to be dropped off. He insisted the café was somewhere else. When we got angry he finally stopped and we gave him the money that was on the meter and he fiddled with the money for ages. Then he pointed to the meter that it wasn’t enough. He hadn’t turned the meter off and thought we were stupid and didn’t realize. When we didn’t want to pay the extra money he locked us into the taxi at which point we got really angry and threatened to call the police. He eventually let us go. So crazy! I haven’t been to the north of the country, so I am not sure if that is any different, but despite what happened I would still go back to Vietnam, as it is so beautiful. I’d just be more on my guard.

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    • OMG your taxi stories are crazy. We have heard similar ones from other tourists, so you are not alone. We did have 1 taxi who’s meter seemed to be going VERY fast compared to the other taxi we had taken in the same town. We tried calling him out on it, and all of a sudden he acted like he didn’t speak any English but he did when we got in the car….The taxi’s and modes of transportation were the worst ones when it comes to scams. We too will be back at some point.

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      • A japanese man arrived at the vietnam airport, he took a taxi to the hotel. He saw a Honda on the road, he said to the vietnamese taxi driver, “Honda, Japanese, very very fast.”

        Then he saw a Toyota, he said, “Toyota. Japanese. very very fast.”

        The taxi arrived at the hotel, the japanese man complained that the meter is faulty and it must have been rigged. The taxi driver then said, “Meter. Vietnamese. Very very fast.”

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  15. Last December was my 2nd time visit back to VN after 9 years in the U.S. A lot of what you said are true unfortunately, like the line-cutting (i got cut twice at the airport) and the nose picking and everything being overpriced…esp in Saigon (don’t ever eat at Ben Thanh Market). Glad you decide to go back to Hoi An. Da-Nang and Hoi An are my 2 favorite places. People there are much nicer and you can definitely walk on the sidewalks. Less polluted, less expensive. Come to Da Lat if you haven’t. And I’m sorry about the coffee thing. Don’t know why they couldn’t understand you. My dad always drinks black coffee, no sugar, no ice. Have you tried to order in Vietnamese “cafe den” (black coffee)? Let me know if you need help with the language or anything 😀

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    • Glad you agree with our list, we have gotten quite the comments about it. Some hate mail too… We had a great time in Vietnam and this post was to just recap a few of the things that we don’t miss about Vietnam but lots of people took it the wrong way.

      We loved loved Hoi An, the food & people were amazing there. I couldn’t believe how much we got for our dollar at restaurants there. I will have to add Da Lat to the list for next year. Not sure what happen with the coffee, it wasn’t a huge deal just not what Adam really wanted. Thanks again! When’s your next visit?

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      • Sorry Hannah for the late reply. My boyfriend and I plan to come back next summer if everything goes according to plan. We ll spend more time in Dalat to check out some of the waterfalls and tea leaf mountains. I just recommended your blog to my preceptor since she also wants to travel to Vietnam. I’m really impressed with how you navigated your way around Vietnam !!!!

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  16. hi Hannah,

    Coffee is a cult in vietnam, and vietnamese dont drink coffee without sugar. So for a foreigner to order coffee without sugar is like committing a cultural faux pas, thats why they still bring coffee with sugar to you. Its like you go to texas and order a bbq ribs but ask the ribs not to have any bbq sauce on it. Not a good example, but you do get my point?

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    • Lol, love your comparison. I understand they love it with sugar, but Adam prefers it without but even though it always came with sugar he always drank it. Can never let coffee go to waste.

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  17. Just to point out a few things Hannah: Number #1 – I agree. Space is a premium and it’s part of the culture, no way getting around that. #2 – Yes and no. If your bag/luggage is large where it takes up a space of a passenger, you will get charge a price equivalent to another passenger. I know this from taking public transit so it’s not a scam. If it’s small enough to go under a seat or on you, it is. #3 Cutting in line – Yes, it’s a problem but you’ll have to understand why it is this way. It can be traced back to a time when food was ration do to international embargo led by the U.S. Being last may mean being hungry. #4 – Size – agreed. I’m average 5’9″ – 170, and that’s pretty much what they considered XXL here. Even shoes don’t come wide, which is a problem. However, you can get it made by hand tailored to your size at a very affordable price. #5 – Motorbikes – Highly disagree. It’s what makes VN so unique. It’s the king of motorbikes and due to space, it’s the only vehicle that makes any sense. I personally love it. #6 – Nose picking – Ditto. #7 – Food price – Disagree. In 8 yrs, I never had to haggle over food since price are usually posted. If you’re talking about buying things at the market, that’s completely different. I suggest if that’s the case, you go to the supermarket where everything is labeled. Or, write down the price of what you see at the supermarket and then negotiate with them at the market. One caveat, 90 per cent of fruits/veggies at the local markets come from China where it’s highly tainted with toxic chemicals. Supermarkets stuff has to be labeled with their source of origin. #8 – Coffee – Just complaining about this will get you label a complainer. Use Google or Bing translator; it’s there for a reason since you don’t know the language. The miscommunication is on your part. You can see as many have pointed out. You are in THEIR country not the other way around. If there’s a language problem, it’s not their fault. I’m from Connecticut and I expect visitors from out of town to speak English in Connecticut. If they don’t understand what I have to say in Connecticut, it’s not my problem. Comprendo?

    I’m surprised you didn’t mention sanitation as being an issue or pissing in public. It bothers me and I’ve been here for a while. However, one trip to other parts of the world i.e. India, Africa, or S.America would certainly change your mind. Take it for what it is and enjoy your stay. It’s not there yet but it’s a treasure chest in some respect. You should visit the So Doon Cavern, Sapa, or Dalat for relaxation. For great weather, try Mui Ne in Phan Thiet or visit Can Tho market on the river. Enjoy!

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    • Our issue with the luggage was the man wanted 100,000 VD when my bus ticket was only 60,000 VD which I stated above. If he had asked for 20,000 maybe, and the luggage was on the roof and we clearly had more passengers than belonged. We expected everything to be small, as the Vietnamese people are smaller and it’s their country so things are made for their size. Just one of the things we don’t miss as Adam is 6’5 and I’m 5’10. The motorbikes are something that is truly unique to Vietnam, but again something we PERSONALLY don’t miss. We tried to shop at stores with prices marked and scanners, but that is not always possible. We would ask how much, get an answer and start walking away and then the price would magically start dropping it just got really old really fast, again we don’t miss that all. I prefer to have prices marked, asking for prices is annoying. The coffee thing we even stated was a petty complaint, but in a nice coffee shop with a menu in English & Vietnamese where the servers speak English you would think if we ask for a hot black coffee NO ice NO sugar NO milk NO cream we could get that, NOPE.

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    • Which we are unsure what the problem with is is, if you read the article entirely you will see we really enjoyed our time in Vietnam and plan on returning. This list is just a list of little things we don’t miss, now if we talk about things we do miss I could go on. The food, oh my god the food in! We are unsure what the real problem is…

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  18. Just a gentle reminder: you are travelling the world, living a dream. You’re in Vietnam, a place where, for example, mines from the Vietnam War are still maiming people and one of your top ten peeves is sugar in the coffee? I understand that you’re keeping it light, but geez. Talk about first world problems.

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    • You are correct we are living the dream, and are very fortunate enough to be traveling the world. Please note that we enjoyed our time in Vietnam, and this post was written in a light and comical way. When we got to Laos, this was a list of things that we didn’t miss about Vietnam. There are many things I really do miss about Vietnam, but this specific post was to showcase the 7 FEW things that we didn’t miss. The coffee with sugar, even states it is a petty complaint it was just something that bothered us. Have you read our other Vietnam posts? Please do, and we have several more in the queue.

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  19. Picking the nose is # 1 because they don’t wash their hands. Took 8 months of telling my brother-in-law to wash his hands after coming in from the street. #2 Moterbikes riding on sidewalk. I got hit twice from behind by motorbike. All they say is sorry, sorry. #3 BIG one..throwing trash on ground and leaving mess on table. I was there for 20 months with vietnamese wife and family. My wife would not let me drive in saigon and yes they don’t like the back of the line.

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    • The picking of the nose was everwhere, it just was shocking to us. I understand sometimes you have something in your nose, but get some tissue and then wash your hands. Oh no you were hit 3 times, hope no injuries ever. The throwing of trash is everywhere in the world Central America/South America/Asia/USA you name it but it still bothers me. I swear I will go 20 minutes carrying an empty can looking for a garbage can. I wouldn’t attempt to drive in saigon ever, after a day I got a method of crossing the street down but every so often one bike would do a move I wasn’t expecting. The line cutting just was really rude, grr…

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    • That’s a good one, we try that sometimes too but sometimes it’s hard to see what bills they paid with and what their change was. Since they usually speak in their local language. Thanks for the tip.

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  20. Cafe den khong duong. (Black coffee, no sugar)
    Cafe nong, khong duong. (Hot black coffee, no sugar)

    You can say, khong sua if you want to be explicit about not getting condensed milk.

    Quite easy really.

    Never had to bargain for food in 5 years here. That’s a new one on me.
    Also, some bus companies will charge you for your bags, boxes or motorbikes to go in the hold. Small bag under the seat or in your lap won’t get charged. 100k from Danang to Hue would be way over the top though.

    Best to research a little before you slate a country for trying to rip you off when it is just a different payment culture.

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    • Thank you for all the different ways to ask for the coffee, we will make sure to try these out next year. We had an amazing time in Vietnam, and still enjoyed the coffee. The food bargaining was something new to us, as we haven’t ever done this in the past. We found we would be given inflated prices even on donuts/fruit/water/etc. we would usually just ask how much and then walk away and then they would yell back with a lower price.

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  21. It’s pretty easy to get coffee with no sugar.

    Ca phe khong duong = coffee no sugar

    No ice = khong da

    No milk = khong sua

    Did you try to communicate in Vietnamese? In writing? Show them with Google Translate on your phone?

    Another thing about the food prices. Yes. They overcharge foreigners. You usually have to stay in the area for a while to know the normal price and if you speak Vietnamese you’re more likely to get the local price.

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    • I wish I would have known all those translations last month! Usually we just pointed to it on the menu and asked for no sugar no milk black. Even at the Highlands, where everyone spoke English, it still wasn’t black. It was no biggy, we drank the coffee and enjoyed our time in Vietnam.

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      • Google Translate and an app called Vietnamese Best Dict are pretty good. And if you search torrents, there are some Vietnamese books out there. The nice thing about Vietnam is that it uses the Latin alphabet.

        The thing that I find more annoying than nose picking is guys peeing in public (can’t blame them because there aren’t many public restrooms) and people littering.

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        • Thanks for the app recommendation, will check that one out. Peeing in public is annoying too, but that is all over the world and your right you can’t blame them when public restaurants aren’t easily available.

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    • We had a great time in Vietnam, and really like it but after 25 days these are the top things that stood out that we currently don’t miss. Now the food I have a long list of the things I miss! We never learned the Vietnamese for no sugar we usually pointed to it in the menu hot coffee and say no sugar no milk and they always said yes or nodded (appearing to understand). Maybe next time we will try to speak Vietnamese, TRY is the key word there. Thanks again.

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  22. Maybe you should have tried asking for Cà phê nóng
    And you do realise that condensed milk is the norm, it is sweet so most likely not sugared coffee at all.

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    • Thanks for the local language tip. Yes we have realized that condensed milk seems to go in almost all coffees/teas/drinks, which is good in several. But Adam prefers his coffee BLACK no sugar no milk, which is not the norm here in Asia. Thanks again!

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      • You are right, dark coffee without sugar is not a norm in Vietnam. We usually enjoy a black coffee with condensed milk, very sweet, thick. Just like in the U.S people enjoy coffee latte, but to me it doesn’t have much flavor ( taste like water with coffee flavor) :P. And there is no way I can order my coffee with condensed milk here in the U.S. I did end up making my kind of yummy coffee at home, and my husband loves it ( he’s American 😉 ). And this type of coffee is called ” cà phe sua da”, just let you know so you guys won’t order it next time you come back :). Anyway, you totally can order coffee the way you like by telling them you want ” ca phe den không đường”. “Không đường” means no sugar, ca phe đen means Black coffee without milk. My dad lives in Vietnam, and this is his order every morning :). I think you might want to know how to order things in the language of the country you visiting (for some particular food or drink that you really want). One more thing, VN coffee is also different, I think it tastes better the way it is, if you like that kind of coffee, I recommend you guys go to Starbucks next time ( yes, we have Starbucks now). It will be way easier because they have black coffee in the menu. Yay!!! Thanks for sharing how you feel about our country, I hope your next visiting will be better :).

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  23. Please do not come back to our country you privilaged white person! We do not need your kind here. We will survive without your tourism money and keep our country and traditions to ourselves! Stay at home and stop traveling you whiny piece of shit!

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    • I am not where the negativity is coming from, if you read the first and last lines of the above post it clearly states we had a great time in your country and plan on returning. The list of what we miss about Vietnam is much much longer than what we don’t miss. The above post is just the 7 things that we DON’T miss, not that we hated “the things” just general things that made travel more difficult in your country. The post was written in a comical tone. We are currently writing several more Vietnam posts, so stay tuned if you wish to see more of our time in Vietnam.

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    • Oh, get a life, VITEMON. You are obviously just an insecure twit! I have lived in your country for 5.5 years now and I can say everything in this post is TRUE! If you can’t take a little fun criticism, you are a loser! Your rude comments are not necessary.

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    • You’re the one that sounds like a whiny piece of shit. I could name FIFTEEN things I hate about Vietnam. But that absolutely does not mean I hate Vietnam, as a whole. This country is beautiful. But I’ve come across your type a few times here, and I can easily say that I will not miss the assholes in Vietnam.

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  24. Vietnam is such a unique country, where you can’t find out the second one. I’m happy to enjoy your special photos!
    Every country has its own unique and typical beauty, and everything has 2 sides of coin. Anyway, I hope you spent your precious time visiting the right place.
    thanks a lot for sharing!

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    • I have to agree Vietnam is completely different than any of the other Asian countries we have visited. We really enjoyed our time in Vietnam, and can’t wait to spend more time in Hoi An 6 days wasn’t enough. Glad you enjoyed the photos!

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  25. Hey guys!nice to hearing your trip!all the things u share with us that’s right man-because I’m Vietnamese but living in Aus!but I would like to recommend with your guys 3i important things which small amount places in the world has!
    Firstly, everything so cheap u save ur pocket
    Second,almost Vietnamese respect and like foreigner
    Specially thing u should think abt that my country so safety no bomb no gun..u still come back home with ur parent lol…
    Having fun try with another topic 70 things u want back to vietnam!hope to hear u again

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    • Vietnam was really nice to our wallets, and we ate like kings & queens! I agree we felt safe, and never any issues. We do have a long list of things we miss about Vietnam too, planning a return already.

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        • Vietnam was really nice on our wallet too, but even nicer on your’s with your Vietnamese wife! Next time we return we will have a general idea of the going prices.

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  26. You are right for the first 7 things, the 8th one is not really true. You can order the coffee using the coffee-filter. Or you just say that you want a coffee without or less sugar.

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    • We tried, we would say hot black coffee no sugar no milk and it always failed. We ended up buying our own ground coffee, and made our own coffee in our room. We had a great time in Vietnam, planning a return to Hoi An already.

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  27. The coffee thing drives me crazy too! My biggest coffee frustration location? Sydney! They claim to have such a huge coffee culture, as a lot of Australian cities do, but the truth is that they are using discount beans and standard espresso machines. We’d easily pay $4 or more for a long black (translation: Americano) or a flat white (translation: we charge you latte prices but give you 1/3 the amount of beverage). It wasn’t that it was bad but I kept thinking Sydney needs to get over itself in terms of its so called cafe scene. The icing on the cake – horrible instant coffee in all hotels and hostels. Wait, I thought you were a super serious cafe culture? Thanks for the no name instant powder!

    (Ah. That was therapeutic. Loved everything else about Sydney)

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    • I have to admit we didn’t visit any coffee shops in Australia, they were to far out of our budget. That is crazy though, glad we didn’t attempt them and then be upset with the outcome. Instant coffee is bad no matter what…

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  28. Truly post 😀 !
    However the 8th petty things doesn’t get my agreement ^^, I did drink tons of coffee in Vietnam and must say that you can find easily a non sweet, less sweet, or overly sweet one unless you can’t communicate w the waitress :D.

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  29. Nice post.
    One thing I don’t miss is shop owners yelling: “Come into my shop” – after Vietnam I hate when people say that. I know best my self if I want to look at your shop and your things or not!

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  30. We loved Vietnam too, but the motorbikes… whoa, I do not miss those! The constant line cutting and the nose picking are also some aspects of Korea that can drive me a little crazy.

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    • Great to hear you had a great time in Vietnam too. The motorbikes are something else, we got use to them rather quickly but I can say I don’t miss them. So the line cutting & nose piking is also a problem in Korea, interesting!

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