11 Best Beaches in Turks & Caicos

Are you a beach lover? Some of the best beaches in the world are found in the Turks & Caicos. With so many gorgeous beaches we had to share with you the best beaches in Turks & Caicos to help plan your trip.

Located in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean sits the islands of Turks and Caicos. This archipelago is divided into two clusters (the Turks Islands and the Caicos islands) which in total consists of 40 individual islands. However, only eight of these islands are inhabited. The most populated island is Providenciales, which can be found in the Caicos Islands. Cross over the passage into the Turks Island and visit Grand Turk or Salt Cay, the only two inhabited islands in this cluster.

We first fell in love with this island on our Holland America Caribbean cruise and later returned for a week staying at Beaches Turks & Caicos. This island is one of our favorite Caribbean Islands, make sure to check out our best Caribbean Islands article to see which island suits you best. 

During your visit to the Turks and Caicos Islands, you’ll be treated to some of the most stunning beaches on the planet. With over 200 miles of white sand beaches, there’s something for almost every type of visitor. The Turks and Caicos Islands cater to sunbathers, snorkelers, and even kite surfers, and it’s not difficult to find your own little slice of paradise while visiting.

If you’re looking to spend a day swimming in the warm, turquoise waters, or wiggling your toes in the soft sugar sand, then you can’t go wrong with any of the beaches on the islands. However, there are certain places you absolutely must tick off your checklist. Here’s our list of the best beaches in the Turks and Caicos.


1. Grace Bay Beach

The award-winning Grace Bay sits on the northeastern coast of Providenciales and continues to be one of the most popular places in the Caicos Islands. Despite only being three miles long, crystal clear coastline and spotless white sand beaches have earned Grace Bay the title of World’s Leading Beach Destination by World Travel Awards and World’s Best Beach by Trip Advisor.

If you’re staying at a high-end hotel or luxury resort in Providenciales, chances are it’s located on the shores of Grace Bay. Unless you’re a guest at one of the hotels, beach access is only possible using one of the public entrances on Grace Bay Road. Besides enjoying the tropical views, you can spend the day sunbathing, snorkeling, or dining at one of the many restaurants lining the bay.

Grace Bay is also the best beach for water activities. You’ll find a plethora of boat tour companies, kayak and paddleboard rental shops, sunset cruise excursions, and parasailing adventures that you can book. If you want to be in the middle of all the action of Providenciales, then Grace Bay Beach is where you’ll want to base yourself during your trip

2. Leeward Beach

For a pristine slice of paradise, visit Leeward Beach in Providenciales. Other beaches on the island can be crowded throughout the day with families and locals – but not Leeward. Despite the fact that it’s close to Grace Bay, this seven-mile stretch of the beach remains relatively untouched by mass tourism. While there are a few private homes and rental villas, it’s far less developed in terms of resorts and hotels.

Although you’ll find wakeboarders, tubers, and tour boats shuffling back and forth in the water, the beach itself is the perfect place to unwind and relax. You can enter Leeward through either the east or west entrances. While the beaches are open to the public, you will still need to pass through the gated security booths on your way.

3. Half Moon Bay

You can’t visit Turks and Caicos without stopping by the infamous Half Moon Bay. This sandbar is nestled between the uninhabited islands of Little Water Cay and Water Cay and boasts almost one mile of pristine white-sand shores. Don’t let its secluded location fool you – Half Moon Bay is still one of the most popular destinations for tourists to visit from Providenciales. Due to warm, shallow waters, this beach is very popular for day-trippers.

One of the coolest ways to visit the bay is by kayak. You can also buy tickets for a day-boat charter which will visit Half Moon Bay as one of its stops. While you’re there, you can wander around the magnificent limestone cliffs where you’ll find native rock iguanas sunbathing in plain sight. Besides the influx of day visitors, there aren’t any modern facilities or restaurants, so it’ll still feel like you stumbled upon one of Turks and Caicos’ most hidden gems.

4. Long Bay Beach

Providenciales is known for its spectacular beaches, and Long Bay Beach is no exception. It stretches for three miles along the southeastern side of the island, which is relatively more laid back than the beaches on the northern side. The waters here are protected by Caicos Banks, which means you won’t see too many choppy waves. That makes it a great destination for kayakers, paddleboarders, and sunbathers. Because of its even consistency and pure white color, many visitors also say that the sand at Long Bay Beach is the softest on the entire island!

This area is primarily residential, with a few modern developments and beach rentals within walking distance. If you’re visiting by car, you can use the designated parking lot next to Shore Club, which we believe is the most accessible entrance to find. It’s connected to the beach using a short boardwalk.

5. Taylor Bay Beach

Although it’s one of the smallest beaches on Providenciales, Taylor Bay Beach is still a must-see during your visit to the islands. It has 2,000 feet of beachfront which is sheltered by the incoming winds from the Ocean Point Peninsula. This makes it an excellent choice for families or first-time swimmers. Although the waters are relatively shallow and calm, it’s not the best place for snorkeling (but when the tide rolls out, you might find a few soft corals, fish, and even a couple of nurse sharks).

This area of Providenciales is littered with resorts or hotels, although there are plenty of vacation rental homes nearby. Despite the people, you generally won’t have to worry about crowds. Getting to Taylor Bay Beach is relatively easy, as it’s located just off of Ocean Point Drive. However, parking is very limited, so it’s best to come early in the morning. From the lot, you can take a short walking path from the road that leads directly to the beachy shores.

6. Governor’s Beach

Governor’s Beach is sandwiched between Cruise Center and Cockburn Town on the western side of Providenciales. It’s named after the house where the former governor lived, which is located just a stone’s throw away from the beach. It’s known for its calm waters (the bay is sheltered from trade winds), clear waters, and groves of Casuarina trees.

Due to the water clarity, Governor’s Beach is a popular place for first-time snorkelers, although more experienced swimmers might not be too impressed. This side of the coast isn’t as diverse as the north, so don’t expect to see vibrant coral reefs or an abundance of marine life.

The beach can be easily accessed by car, as there is ample parking and signage from Cruise Center. However, the area can be quite congested during the high season when the cruise ships dock nearby. For this reason, we recommend coming early in the morning or after the ships set out to see in the late afternoon.

7. Sapodilla Bay Beach

Head to the southern coast of Providenciales and spend a few hours at the breathtaking Sapodilla Bay. It boats 900-feet of sugar-white sand that is protected from the wind of Chalk Sound. The beach has one long boat pier jetting into the water, while the rest of the land is surrounded by lush, rugged cliffs. Even the waters are teeming with small marine life, like sea urchins, soft corals, and schools of reef fish.

While there aren’t many hotels in the area, there are quite a few vacation rental homes, which means the beach can be pretty busy during the peak of the day. If you’re driving from another town, you can park in the lot off of South Dock Road (it’s unmarked, so keep your eyes peeled for the Sapodilla Bay Hill Rock Inspiration Trail) or at the entrance of Las Brisa. Even if it’s on the smaller side of the spectrum, Sapodilla Bay is a beautiful area that offers very shallow and calm waters all year round.

8. Blue Hills Beach

Blue Hills Beach is the site of the original settlements that arrived in Providenciales. It’s located on the northwestern coast of the island and can be reached by taking a scenic drive along the iconic Blue Hills Road. This route runs parallel to the ocean, which means you’ll get to enjoy breathtaking views of the colorful residential houses, the sparkling waves, and groves of coconut palm trees inland.

Unlike other beaches on the island, Blue Hills Beach isn’t the best place for swimming or snorkeling. The waters have a lot of seaweed and broken coral floating around, which can make participating in water-based activities quite difficult. However, it is a great place for beachcombing, as you’ll likely find all sorts of seashells that have washed ashore.

Blue Hills Beach is also known for its gastronomy. Stop by the famous Da Conch Shack for delicious fresh seafood and strong cocktails while you enjoy panoramic views of the ocean.

9. Malcolm’s Road Beach

If you’re looking for peace and quiet, then Malcolm’s Road Beach is a must-visit during your trip to Turks and Caicos. It’s located on a relatively secluded part of the west coast Providenciales surrounded by limestone cliffs, lush foliage, and rolling ocean swells.

Snorkelers and scuba divers are in for a treat, as this is the closest beach to the reef wall around the islands. Hire a boat or book a diving tour and experience the unique 7,000-foot drop where you’ll find colorful marine life (including sharks!) and blankets of coral trees. The water isn’t as sheltered as it is on other parts of the island, so all swimmers should be careful as the waves can be quite large during certain points of the day.

Getting to Malcolm’s Road Beach is a little tricky, which is why it remains relatively untouched by tourists. You’ll need to drive down a long, unpaved path full of bumps and potholes, so a 4×4 is highly recommended, especially if it’s been raining.

10. Turtle Tail Beach

Despite its name, Turtle Tail Beach is actually a group of several small beaches near the south coast of the island. The smallest beach is only 50-feet long, while the largest has several hundred feet of sandy coastline. Unfortunately, most of the Turtle Tail Beaches aren’t accessible to the public, as they are located right in front of private vacation homes. However, you are able to visit the main beach, which is approximately three miles down Venetian Road.

Once you arrive, you’ll notice how calm and shallow the waters are at Turtle Tail Beach. They’re only a few feet deep, which means you can walk into the ocean for several yards to visit the neighboring Little Five Cays (Dick Penn Cays is the closest to the main beach). This tiny archipelago of islands is incredibly pretty and rarely sees visitors due to their remoteness.

11. Bight Reef Beach

An underwater paradise for snorkelers and scuba divers, Bight Reef Beach is considered one of the best dive sites in Turks and Caicos. The translucently clear waters are home to a wide variety of fish and marine animals, thanks to its close location near the Coral Gardens Reef. There is a small area of hard and soft corals near the shore, although the outer reaches of the reef are more impressive.

As you navigate the waters, it’s common to find parrotfish, angelfish, butterflyfish, yellowtail snappers, and trumpetfish. Larger creatures also inhabit the area, including spiny lobsters, moray eels, green turtles, hawksbill turtles, southern brown stingrays, and eagle rays.

It’s fairly easy to get to Bight Reef Beach. It’s located next to the Coral Garden Resort and the Windsong Hotel which means there is plenty of parking if you’re driving from another part of the island. You can also walk to the beach from Grace Bay which means it sees its fair share of visitors coming from the nearby resorts.

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